Statutory liability insurance and OHS penalties

nsca-article-0409-001Recently I wrote an article for National Safety magazine entitled “Trials and Tribulations”.  It came about because I heard about an OHS consultancy that was offering safety management services that included a component of insurance.  The insurance was explained to me as covering any OHS fines or penalties that may eventuate for the consultancy’s clients.

This combination of services is very attractive and addresses fundamental OHS questions asked by employers of different sizes – “do I comply?” and “how do I know that I have a safe workplace?”.  They’re slightly different questions but ones I come across regularly.

OHS regulators are getting better at helping small business establish a compliance benchmark through the use of compliance codes for some elements of workplace safety management – a semi-return to prescription.  However, many small business owner do as much as they can to provide a safe workplace and still get prosecuted by the OHS regulator.  This is frustrating and demoralising and in this context an insurance policy is attractive.  The insurance would cover any penalties that the business receives even if the incident that generated the prosecution was “unforeseeable”.

The National Safety article includes legal opinions and insurance company opinions that don’t quite fit.

Some of the interviews I conducted with insurance brokers did little to assuage my unease at insurance policies.  It seems to me that some insurance policies are taken out unnecessarily while other policies often exempt coverage for the very risks one thought the policy covered.  I agree with many insurers who recommend that business insurance is best handled by an experienced risk manager.  Sadly many OHS professionals do not have those skills.

In the context of the OHS consultancy, clients may be reassured by such an insurance policy but it should be an unnecessary expense.  The consultancy provides a monthly assessment service that steers the company through specific workplace hazards.  The consultancy provides some initial OHS advice and resources but no independent audits of the OHS system and the monthly monitors are not trained in OHS.

 The consultancy says that following this system will provide compliance, and maybe it does.  But even compliant workplaces can have incidents that could generate a prosecution.  It is here where the insurance policy should apply. 

The monthly assessment system needs to be diligently followed and payments kept current because non-compliance with the obligations of the system could leave an “out” for the insurer.

Statutory liability insurance, particularly for small business, needs to be examined by the OHS regulators.  Most regulators approached would not comment on the record about such policies, others were dismissive.  The article examines the legal issues further and, sadly, the article is not available online. 

If the regulators are truly supportive of small business and OHS compliance for this sector, there should be some guidance on statutory liability issued.  But like OHS professionals, regulators are not comfortable with policies that compensate (other than workers compensation).  They focus on prevention and prosecution.  It’s time to establish a broader source of OHS policy development, one which includes insurance companies, brokers and risk managers.

Kevin Jonesnsca-cover-0409

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